Donald Sterling Controversy: Let Them Play!

I have truly been racking my brain over this issue since it surfaced and have been back and forth on both sides of the issue. At first analysis, I wanted the Clippers to boycott the organization and not play. However, looking more deeply, I have found justification in their choice to remain contenders in the NBA playoffs. 

I support the Clippers in their decision to finish out the season and I will tell you why. It is without question that Donald Sterling is a racist and is living under the notion that it is inappropriate for blacks and whites to publicly mingle. It is also public knowledge that he does not respect blacks nor believe that they are on par with whites, socially. However, is it rational to let this mans beliefs prohibit the players from shining as extraordinary individuals that possess talents that millions aspire to? If the players were to let a bigot, such as Donald Sterling, directly or indirectly hinder a showcase of their abilities, they would be falling into the same mold of African-American’s talents being suppressed, as it has been for centuries. If I could be part of their team meeting about this issue, I would pose the questions, “are you going to let a racist get in the way of you winning the NBA title? Just because this man doesn’t support blacks, are you going to give up and let him stand as a deterrence for you to get a championship ring?” 

Opposition may pose the concern that by the players taking the court, they are supporting Donald Sterling. And while monetarily this may be true, it is also important to note that during this controversy, Donald Sterling has damaged his own self-image within the realm of basketball, and the world, that will prohibit him from playing an integral role in anything relating to basketball ever again. The large majority of NBA personnel, fans, legends, have lost all respect for him. The Clippers players took the upper hand on the issue, handled the situation responsibly, and acted as exemplary professionals would. Donald Sterling’s potential monetary gain will just be additional money to his already enormous bank account. 

It is crucial during this time to respect and support the Clippers basketball team and organization, as they have been put in a very burdensome position. These men have worked hard to achieve the status in which they hold and they did not obtain this level of success by letting any outside agent deter them from their end goal, which is to play basketball and win championships. They would be foolish to let someone who has no interest in them, keep them from achieving their goals. 

Racism exists and it is incumbent upon all of us to create awareness about it, but to never let it get in the way of achieving our own ultimate goals. This issue goes past race as well, we cannot let those that only have a detrimental interest in our lives have any effect on how productive we are with our lives. 

Thank you for reading. I would really like to hear what my readers have to say about this topic. Leave responses below in the comment section or tweet me @edwimp.

 

 

Ed Wimp

Changes

One by one, I find myself checking off my to-do list full of dreams that in the past I only could one day wish that I would attain. I am not even 1/100 of the way to all of my goals but the feeling of accomplishment is more addictive than anything on this earth. 2012 was easily the best year of my life and it completely changed the person that I am. I lived outside of my comfort zone and broke down many fears that existed within myself. I have learned that a fear is merely something you don’t understand and have not exposed yourself to. By living outside of my comfort zone, I was forced to face these fears daily and I had no option but to overcome them. I now frequent my previous fears and forget why I was so afraid in the first place. I search for new fears because it gives me a challenge and makes me feel worthwhile.

Everything from touring across the nation, to being in law school, to moving to a brand new city, to being a vegetarian (not anymore), and many more, have helped me to expand my comfort zone and seek fear instead of run from it. Although I am only 23 years old, I feel as though I’ve seen it all and there is nothing that could happen to me or that I could see that would truly shock me (somehow something always surprises me every time I get this mind set).

I have learned so much about human nature including the good, the bad, and the very ugly. Through other people, I have learned a great deal about myself and I am slowly working towards perfection using my trial and error method that ends me in error more times than I would like to admit. But I would never trade any bad experience because a lesson lived, is a lesson learned.

As this new year goes on, I am preparing for many new experiences, and many old experiences. Regardless of where I go or what I do, I still find joy in the people and simple things that I have always loved. As I check off my accomplishments one by one, I still have one that lurks in my head. My biggest accomplishment will take a lifetime to complete so maybe I’ll be typing about whether I did it or not in about 60 years from my deathbed. That accomplishment is to be a happy person when it is all said and done and to live a life that inspires others to take a proactive stance on things that they believe in. This accomplishment is truly all I want in life and the reason I even get out of bed in the morning.

Well I sufficiently wasted some valuable time I was supposed to be doing a ‘Motion for Summary Judgment’ writing assignment and now I have to go to class, but I wanted to catch anyone who cares up with my life and how I’m doing. Thank you for reading.

Ed Wimp

@edwimp

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Interview With Joshua Weidling. Founder of DIGITAL TOUR BUS.

I personally enjoy seeing entrepreneurs pursuing professional goals at a young age. It is never too early to begin your own business, nor should one be intimidated by the thought of being a young businessman. To create a successful business, you must create an innovative product and Joshua Weidling, founder of Digital Tour Bus has accomplished this. So please read this interview and be sure to head over to http://www.digitaltourbus.com to see his work.
-Ed Wimp
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1.      What is Digital Tour Bus?
Digital Tour Bus is a media website that is dedicated to bringing you high quality and interesting content on your favorite touring bands and musicians. It all started in 2009 around the idea of filming a band’s tour bus, but now we have content including: concert reviews, contests, tour news, touring tips, tour blogs, and more! Some of the acts we have worked with include: Simple Plan, All Time Low, JoJo, A Day To Remember, Sick Puppies, Story of the Year, Bowling For Soup, Theory of a Deadman and Reel Big Fish.
2.      What do you do for Digital Tour Bus?
My name is Joshua Weidling and I’m the CEO and Founder of the company and website. Most of what you see on Digital Tour Bus’ is posted by me. I organize all of our interviews and coordinate with all of the bands we work with. I manage a team of up to ten video editors at any one time, as well as a team of more than ten concert reviewers. I actually film all of the “tour bus videos” you see on the site, but I do not edit any of the videos. The list of what I do can go on and on, but I’ll stop here, haha.
3.      Why did you start the company and how did the company get started?
While I was a Freshman at the University of Iowa, I came up with the idea to film bands showing off their tour buses and I decided to roll with it. Sure, I could have waited 4 years until I was out of college, but that wouldn’t have been me. People who wait finish last. Well, at least that is how I think.
The story to how Digital Tour Bus got started isn’t anything spectacular. I just started to contact bands about filming with them and the rest is history. Lol.
4.      What are the biggest accomplishments that Digital Tour Bus has achieved?
I guess I would say that my biggest accomplishment is reaching 5 million hits (this actually happened recently). To think that people like my site enough to view it over 5 million times, that just amazes me and still shocks me! Also, when I got to work with the Plain White T’s that was a huge accomplishment for me because that band is literally the reason why I’m in the music industry. They were the first band from the “scene” that I ever listened to and they continue to be my favorite band.
5.      Personally, which band or artist was your favorite to interview?
Even though the Plain White T’s are my favorite band, they weren’t my favorite band to interview. Actually, I have a small list of some of the best video shoots I have ever had. Jaret from Bowling For Soup was a pleasure to work with. The other bands I would include on this short list include: Patent Pending, The Audition, Reel Big Fish, Allstar Weekend and Simple Plan.
6.      What are some changes you would like to see in the music business?
The music business is so focus on reviving the revenue stream of album sales, instead of focusing on creating and developing new revenue streams. This style of thinking is only considering the short-term, not the long-term stability of the industry. Changing the thinking of the suits at the major record labels and the other major music companies is essential for the continued growth of the industry as a whole.
7.      What other roles have you played in the music business outside of Digital Tour Bus?
The other rolls I have played in the music industry definitely tells my story of how I got started and received all of the experience and knowledge I currently use to run Digital Tour Bus. When I was 15, I started promoting bands under the name Chi-Town Promotions. This was all shameless promotion, no money involved and I did it online (via Myspace) and offline at my high school. When I was 16, I started to book local shows and after 3 years, I had booked over 80 concerts with an average attendance over over 200 people. During this time, I had the chance to work with: The Ready Set (Sire), The White Tie Affair (Epic) and over 500 other bands. Then, when I was 17, I interned at the local Chicago music magazine, Crescendo Magazine, as a Marketing and Advertising intern. Following that, I became a news poster at ForTheSound.com, which is actually no longer in existence. Then, when I was 18, I started Digital Tour Bus. Also, while owning Digital Tour Bus, I’ve managed a few bands including The Alumni Club (IL), Backdrop (IA, now Jocelyn) and Scarlett (IL), as well as the music photographer, Mikey Kay.
8.      Who are some other entrepreneurs that you admire and aspire to be more like?
There are two entrepreneurs that instantly come to mind after reading this question and they are Johnny Earle, who owns Johnny Cupcakes, and Rob Dyrdek, the professional skateboarder and very successful entrepreneur.
I look up to both of them in different ways. In Johnny’s case, I look up to him for his ability to build his unique brand and advertise it in unconventional ways. Also, throughout the years he has continued to stick to his brand, which is very hard to do when success comes your way.  In Rob’s case, I look up to him for his ability to develop his personal brand and tie them in perfectly with his brands and endorsements.
9.      What direction is Digital Tour Bus going in? What can we expect in the future?
Unfortunately, I can’t reveal too much of this right now, but you can definitely expect a new version of our website before the year’s end, as well as a enormous amount of new types of content that I’ve been developing over the past 2 years. I’m really excited for the future and for everyone to see what I’ve been working on!
Personal links:
Digital Tour Bus links:
-Ed

My Stance On “KONY 2012”

First and foremost, regardless of your stance on this issue, I feel as though it is a sigh of relief that a meaningful cause is finally the subject of Facebook statuses, twitter statuses, conversation and pop culture. Our youth are aware, and are talking about an issue that matters. Through this issue, they are learning foreign policy, geography, culture and many other important bits of information that will serve them well. Whether you are for or against the involvement in the freeing of children soldiers, the fact that so many people care about this issue gives me a bit more hope for the future of the world. The term “jumping on the bandwagon” has negative connotations but I feel as though in this case it can be good. Teens are becoming politically aware and discussing things other than fads and trends. This issue is real and it is effecting a lot of people.

 

Now as far as the issue itself goes… It has pro’s and con’s, hence the term “issue”. It is very easy for the Invisible Children to appeal to the hearts of sympathetic Americans. Of course Children fighting is wrong. On the other hand, getting involved in this effort to free these Children is very risky and would result in many deaths. The scale that this issue could escalate is unknown. Something must be done about this issue, but it must be done tactfully. In most situations involving injustice, the issue must get worse for a brief time before it gets better. However, risking one child’s life for the betterment of other generations is difficult for me to accept. We must move with caution and do our best to insure the safety of all involved. *Below is an article about the history of Children Soldiers in Uganda and some of the negatives to the KONY 2012 approach*.

http://africanarguments.org/2012/03/08/the-problem-with-invisible-childrens-kony-2012-by-michael-deibert/

I support the Invisible Children and think that if anything, they have done a great job of spreading awareness of this issue. I played a show with Koji last summer (musician/activist) and remember the heartwarming speech he gave about this effort and how much it means to him. I was inspired by his speech and became knowledgeable about this topic. This issue has grown to mean a lot to me, however, I worry that these proposed actions could have future, unforeseen ramifications.

 

In conclusion, it doesn’t bother me that people are “jumping on the Kony 2012 bandwagon”. It’s about time people jumped on a worthwhile bandwagon that truly affects the world we live in. The LRA is inflicting an injustice on Children in Uganda and it needs attention. As Americans, we take much for granted and it is our duty to help those that can not help themselves. I commend the Invisible Children for their impeccable marketing strategies to get this issue to the forefront of media and everyday conversation. I just ask YOU THE READER to always research what you read. After all, you should only believe half of what you see, and none of what you hear. I just hope that we can find a way to free these children with the least amount of bloodshed as possible.

 

Ed Wimp

@edwimp

RIP Andrew Kuebrich

January 25th, 2012, I receive the news that my dear friend Andrew Kuebrich was killed on a bike ride across Taiwan. Andrew was the most motivated person I have ever met and left a lasting impression on everybody. I can guarantee that there is not a single person in this world that has ever had a negative opinion of him. He was truly the definition of what a person should be.

Whenever someone dies, it is very common, regardless of their true character, for others to speak highly of them. Although it is important to respect those that have gone before us, it makes it very difficult to find the combination of words that speaks to Andrew’s character, and drive without sounding cliche.

At first, Andrew’s death confused me. Why him? Out of every person in this world, why was he taken from us? But I think I may have the answer… Andrew led a very influential life. I know for a fact that he influenced me and everyone he knew. Andrew had a passion for running, and shortly after Andrew died, I went running on a cold January night. I set a personal best distance record and for some reason I didn’t get tired. What I’m trying to say is this… Andrew impacted a lot of people, and as a result of Andrews death, everyone that he impacted will now go on to achieve more than they believed they were capable of because they will not only accomplish for themselves, but also for Andrew. Only a small percentage of the population has the ability to be a leader… Andrew was the definition of a leader. I have made changes in my life to aspire to be more like Andrew. If I want to do something, I do it. If I believe something is wrong, I don’t do it. Plain and simple. He will be terribly missed. RIP Andrew Kuebrich.

Recently Asked Question

Ok so I posted on Facebook and Twitter that I would answer in detail my favorite question that anyone asked me on http://www.formspring.me/edwimp. So far, my favorite question has been: “what are some landmarks in or around Chicago that are important to you?”

This question is important to me because Chicago is important to me. Since I was a child, there have been many different landmarks that have played a role in my life. Starting with my earliest memories, The University of Chicago Lab School and the Hyde Park area in general (which I live very close to) have played a big role in my life. I attended The Lab School until the 6th grade. Although I transferred at the age to Morgan Park Academy, my roots in Hyde Park still stayed strong. I played baseball in Hyde Park still and had a lot of friends in the area, not to mention, I still live about ten minutes from Hyde Park to this day.

Before my Grandmothers passing, she lived at The Newport Building in Hyde Park right off of Lake Shore Drive. I spent many days after school there when I was younger. My grandmother passed away when I was 8 years old, but I still remember every detail about her apartment. Everything from the exact shade of her carpeting to the smell of the rooms. Outside of her apartment was a baseball field that high school aged kids would play at. Every time there was a game I would watch and be in awe of how good they all were. As it turns out, when I turned 16, the baseball league that I was in would play games at that field quit frequently. It always reminded me of my grandmother when I played there.

I spent most of my summer days/nights at the Skatepark at 31st and Lake Shore Drive. Skateboarding was my life from when I was 10-17. I absolutely loved it and went to the skatepark any chance I got whether I was with friends or alone.

I went to Morgan Park Academy at 111th and Bell from the 7th grade to when I graduated high school. I made a lot of friends there that I still keep in contact with today. At my high school graduation from MPA I played “I Won’t Forget You, Goodbye” for the first time publicly. Since the song means a lot to me I decided to keep playing it and put it on the album Becoming The Wave. Every Wakes Dream still plays the song.

The Olympia Fields, Burr Ride, Homewood, Evergreen Park and Beverly areas all hold importance to me because I spent a lot of time hanging out in these areas because the majority of my friends lived in these areas.

Last but not least, my house has probably been the most substantial landmark that I will always value. I have lived in the house since I was born and have more memories there than I could ever explain.

So there you have it! Thanks so much for the questions and I’ll be sure to keep answering them on http://www.formspring.me/edwimp.

Ed